Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Name Information
23/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) A London correspondent writes:- ‘Another Irish girl, for she is only that, Lady Eileen Clarke, has a son. She is the second daughter of the Earl and Countess of Ranfurly and married, soon after the outbreak of the war, Lieutenant E Clarke, son of Mr and Mrs Carlos Clarke. She was one of Queen Mary’s train bearers, and has the Coronation medal, and she is a great favourite in society, as was proved by the great anxiety shown when she had appendicitis and was very ill the season before the war. She is a clever musician and composed a waltz which is often played by crack military bands. Her only brother, Viscount Northland, who was killed early in the war, was deeply attached to his younger sister, as she to him. Lord and Lady Ranfurly have now another grandchild.
23/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) 02155
23/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th December 1915:
23/12/2018 Pte. Edward Hughes James Hughes, Coalisland, was notified on Saturday by telegram that his son, Edward Hughes, who enlisted for the term of the war, died that day in a Glasgow hospital of wounds received in the Dardanelles. The deceased, who lived in Glasgow, leaves a wife and children.
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23/12/2018 Pte. Edward Hughes From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th December 1915: Coalisland
23/12/2018 Pte. Thomas John Cross The subs were Private S Proctor (Coalisland) and W Gallagher (Killyman), and amongst the the large crowd of spectators were Sergeants P J Weir and J Ringland, and both of whom, I may add, are looking very fit. The match was very fast and exciting throughout, and neither the players nor spectators were troubled for the time being by the enemy or their shells. The game resulted in a win for sections 5/7 by 5 goals to 2.
23/12/2018 Pte. Thomas John Cross 6/8 Section: Private T J Cross (Dungannon), Private Joe Beggs (Dungannon), Lance Corporal McMenemy (Dungannon), Private R Carroll (Castlecaulfield), Private R Wigton (Killyman), Private E Clarke (Bangor), Private R Hogshaw (Killyclogher), Private J Kelly (Castlecaulfield), Corporal James Anderson (Dungannon), Private W J Orr (Ballynakelly), Bandsman T Henry (Dungannon)
23/12/2018 Pte. Thomas John Cross 5/7 Section: Privates James Henderson (Tamnamore, Sergeant E G Lucas (Parkanaur), Private S Cowan (Belfast), Private S Lambe (Dungannon), Private F Mason (Belfast), Private J Breadon, (Belfast), Drummer Scot (Belfast), Private Maxwell (Belfast), Private Campbell (Liverpool), Private D Ewart (Belfast), Lance Corporal A Getty (Ballymoney).
23/12/2018 Pte. Thomas John Cross Private Thomas J Cross of the 9th Battalion Royal Inniskillings Fusiliers, writes:- ‘Just a few lines to let you know that we are enjoying the good old game of football out here. We had a great match on Saturday 11th December, and a prize for the winners was presented by Sergeant G Belshaw, late of Moygashel. It was a platoon match – the 5th and 7th sections versus the 6th and 8th sections. The following were the teams:-
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23/12/2018 Pte. Thomas John Cross From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th December 1915: Football at the Front
22/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates ‘Just a few lines to let you know I am well. You can tell Mrs Chambre I received her parcel alright, and I am very thankful to her for sending it. We have left the Dardanelles and are now in Serbia, having a go at the Bulgarians. The weather is very cold here, and there is plenty of rain. It is very bad country, and there is nothing but hills all around us. I have met lots of old chums, and have been speaking to Johnny MacKay, William Erskine and Bob Taylor. Bill Rea and Bob Sandes are also here, but Tommy Proctor is not out, and I don’t know where he is. I hear that Tom (Gates) has enlisted in the Australian contingent, and in the last letter I had from him he says he is doing well.’
22/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates Private Matthew Gates, 6th Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his parents at Park Road, Dungannon says:-
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22/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Private Gates in Serbia (brother of Thomas Gates)
22/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates Private Samuel Gates, 9th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing from the western front to his relatives at Park Road, Dungannon, says he is getting on quite well and wishes to be remembered to a number of his friends, whom he mentioned by name.
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22/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Private Samuel Gates (brother of Thomas Gates)
22/12/2018 Trooper Robert Daniel Robert’s mother, Marion Daniel, died on 3rd December 1915.
22/12/2018 Trooper Robert Daniel DANIEL – 3rd December, Marion, beloved wife of Robert Daniel of Derryvale, Dungannon and sixth daughter of the late Richard Pike of Beechgrove, Dungannon
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22/12/2018 Trooper Robert Daniel From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Deaths
22/12/2018 Lieut Ernest Daniel Ernest’s mother, Marion Daniel, died on 3rd December 1915.
22/12/2018 Lieut Ernest Daniel DANIEL – 3rd December, Marion, beloved wife of Robert Daniel of Derryvale, Dungannon and sixth daughter of the late Richard Pike of Beechgrove, Dungannon
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22/12/2018 Lieut Ernest Daniel From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th December 1915: Deaths
21/12/2018 Pte. Robert Somerville Lance Corporal Fed J Doonan, of the 9th Tyrone Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his mother Mrs Doonan, Dungannon says:-
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21/12/2018 Pte. Robert Somerville From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Corporal Doonan Meets Friends at the Front
20/12/2018 L/Corp Randal Edmund McManus I also met ‘Major’ McBride and young Donaghy. I was carrying a despatch for the colonel and had to cycle a few miles along the road to headquarters, and in passing the 6th Dragoons, I was surprised to hear Randy McManus and Harry Hamilton calling after me. I also met a little chap called Joe, who was chauffeur in Major Howard’s. I got sll the letters, papers and parcels, which I enjoyed very much, especially the nuts, etc. I was surprised to hear of father joining, but he had been often talking about it. He has done his duty.’
20/12/2018 L/Corp Randal Edmund McManus Jack Johnston and George Hickey came to see me. It was very dark and I had to light a match to see who they were, and I nearly fell with surprise and delight. They both came through a lot of fighting and are now in a rest camp close to our battalion.
20/12/2018 L/Corp Randal Edmund McManus ‘We have been moving about from village to village for the last month, and there are very few villages in the north of France but we have been in. I could fill pages regarding our life in France, but so much is happening here it would be impossible to say everything. We kept moving so quietly about that in a very short time we were up in the town next to the firing line. I have been to the reserve trenches with the Commanding Officer, Major, Adjutant, and am thankful to have got back safely. Our battalion was in the firing line for over three days experience previous to taking over our own line of trenches, and had only one casualty – Donnell of Derry. It was practically his own fault, as he had been told to keep his head down by his Company Officer, but he took another look and was instantaneously shot between the eyes. He was a very bright chap of nineteen. We are back for a rest and a good bit from the firing line. You would be surprised to see our poor lads coming out of the trenches after three days without sleep. They are covered in mud from head to foot. We keep our old motto – ‘Keep Smiling’.
20/12/2018 L/Corp Randal Edmund McManus Lance Corporal Fed J Doonan, of the 9th Tyrone Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his mother Mrs Doonan, Dungannon says:-
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20/12/2018 L/Corp Randal Edmund McManus From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Corporal Doonan Meets Friends at the Front
20/12/2018 Trooper Harry (ww1) Hamilton I also met ‘Major’ McBride and young Donaghy. I was carrying a despatch for the colonel and had to cycle a few miles along the road to headquarters, and in passing the 6th Dragoons, I was surprised to hear Randy McManus and Harry Hamilton calling after me. I also met a little chap called Joe, who was chauffeur in Major Howard’s. I got sll the letters, papers and parcels, which I enjoyed very much, especially the nuts, etc. I was surprised to hear of father joining, but he had been often talking about it. He has done his duty.’
20/12/2018 Trooper Harry (ww1) Hamilton Jack Johnston and George Hickey came to see me. It was very dark and I had to light a match to see who they were, and I nearly fell with surprise and delight. They both came through a lot of fighting and are now in a rest camp close to our battalion.
20/12/2018 Trooper Harry (ww1) Hamilton ‘We have been moving about from village to village for the last month, and there are very few villages in the north of France but we have been in. I could fill pages regarding our life in France, but so much is happening here it would be impossible to say everything. We kept moving so quietly about that in a very short time we were up in the town next to the firing line. I have been to the reserve trenches with the Commanding Officer, Major, Adjutant, and am thankful to have got back safely. Our battalion was in the firing line for over three days experience previous to taking over our own line of trenches, and had only one casualty – Donnell of Derry. It was practically his own fault, as he had been told to keep his head down by his Company Officer, but he took another look and was instantaneously shot between the eyes. He was a very bright chap of nineteen. We are back for a rest and a good bit from the firing line. You would be surprised to see our poor lads coming out of the trenches after three days without sleep. They are covered in mud from head to foot. We keep our old motto – ‘Keep Smiling’.
20/12/2018 Trooper Harry (ww1) Hamilton Lance Corporal Fed J Doonan, of the 9th Tyrone Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his mother Mrs Doonan, Dungannon says:-
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20/12/2018 Trooper Harry (ww1) Hamilton From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Corporal Doonan Meets Friends at the Front
20/12/2018 R/man John Alexander Doonan I also met ‘Major’ McBride and young Donaghy. I was carrying a despatch for the colonel and had to cycle a few miles along the road to headquarters, and in passing the 6th Dragoons, I was surprised to hear Randy McManus and Harry Hamilton calling after me. I also met a little chap called Joe, who was chauffeur in Major Howard’s. I got sll the letters, papers and parcels, which I enjoyed very much, especially the nuts, etc. I was surprised to hear of father joining, but he had been often talking about it. He has done his duty.’
20/12/2018 R/man John Alexander Doonan Jack Johnston and George Hickey came to see me. It was very dark and I had to light a match to see who they were, and I nearly fell with surprise and delight. They both came through a lot of fighting and are now in a rest camp close to our battalion.
20/12/2018 R/man John Alexander Doonan ‘We have been moving about from village to village for the last month, and there are very few villages in the north of France but we have been in. I could fill pages regarding our life in France, but so much is happening here it would be impossible to say everything. We kept moving so quietly about that in a very short time we were up in the town next to the firing line. I have been to the reserve trenches with the Commanding Officer, Major, Adjutant, and am thankful to have got back safely. Our battalion was in the firing line for over three days experience previous to taking over our own line of trenches, and had only one casualty – Donnell of Derry. It was practically his own fault, as he had been told to keep his head down by his Company Officer, but he took another look and was instantaneously shot between the eyes. He was a very bright chap of nineteen. We are back for a rest and a good bit from the firing line. You would be surprised to see our poor lads coming out of the trenches after three days without sleep. They are covered in mud from head to foot. We keep our old motto – ‘Keep Smiling’.
20/12/2018 R/man John Alexander Doonan Lance Corporal Fed J Doonan, of the 9th Tyrone Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his mother Mrs Doonan, Dungannon says:-
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20/12/2018 R/man John Alexander Doonan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 27th November 1915: Corporal Doonan Meets Friends at the Front (Fred Doonan - brother of John Doonan)
19/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson Sapper Samuel Lawson, Royal Engineers (Ulster Division), written to his relatives at Milltown, Dungannon, several bright letters dealing with his experiences in France. In the barn in which he billeted, although quite warm in the straw, he could see the stars shining through the holes in the roof. As to the rats about which all the local soldiers are complaining, he says they hold nightly parades and squeaking concerts over and around him.
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19/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th November 1915: Sapper Samuel Lawson (brother of George Lawson)
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton Lance Corporal John Fulton is listed on Moy War Memorial as John Fullerton.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton Lance Corporal J M Fulton is buried in Mill Road Cemetery.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton Lance Corporal John Fulton was serving with the 14th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles when he was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1st July 1916.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton John Fulton enlisted in Belfast.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton The 1901 census lists John M as age 9, living with the family at house 5 in Ballycarry Street, Clifton, Belfast. His father was a widower and a shipyard helper.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton The family moved to Belfast.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton John’s mother, Eleanor Fulton, died on 24th March 1899 in the Dungannon area. She was 40 years old. John was 7 years old.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton Known family: Joseph Fulton, Eleanor Fulton, Annie Fulton (born 15th September 1889), John Marshall Fulton (born 26th July 1891), James F H Fulton (born 26th September 1895).
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton John Fulton was born in the Benburb area (which borders on Moy) on 26th July 1891. He was one of at least three children.
18/12/2018 L/Corp John Marshall Fulton John Marshall Fulton was the eldest son of Joseph and Eleanor Fulton Joseph Fulton and Eleanor Hazleton were married on 11th April 1888 in the district of Dungannon.
18/12/2018 Pte. J Daly Private T Daly from Union Place, Dungannon served with the 6th Battalion Connaught Rangers.
18/12/2018 Pte. J Daly There was also a CSM James Daly, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, from Augher. He was awarded a DSO and survived the war.
18/12/2018 Pte. J Daly There was a Private J P Daly from Coalisland. It is believed he survived the war.
18/12/2018 Pte. J Daly There was a Private J Daly, from Moy, who served and died in the war with the Australian Infantry. He is listed elsewhere on the Memorial. He served under an alias so this may have caused some confusion.
18/12/2018 Pte. J Daly There is a Private J Daly, R.I.F., listed on Dungannon War Memorial.
18/12/2018 Pte. James (aka Jack) Daly (aka Hart) Private Daly is commemorated on Dungannon War Memorial as Private J Daly, A.I.F.
17/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates Private Matthew Gates, 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing from the eastern front to his sister at Park Road, Dungannon says he is well and hopes all are well at home. He has not received any of the parcels yet, but as soon as he gets them he will let them know. He heard from Tom who has enlisted also.
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17/12/2018 Pte. Thomas Gates From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 20th November 1915: Private Matthew Gates (brother of Thomas Gates)
17/12/2018 Lieut Hugh Adolphus Hector Warnock Lieutenant H A H Warnock, 4th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, was reported wounded and missing on 12th August, and no news of his fate was obtained for some time. After exhaustive enquiries, the British Red Cross Inquiry Department for wounded and missing prisoners has ascertained that Lieutenant Warnock succumbed to his wounds on 16th August at Bapaume, and the sad news has now been communicated to them. The deceased, who was 21 years of age, was the eldest son of Dr Hugh Warnock and Mrs Warnock of Clogher. He was educated at St Columba’s College and Trinity College, Dublin, gaining his commission from the O.T.C. in August 1914, and being posted to the 4th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, with whom he served with at Carrickfergus and Belfast. He was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on 1st May a few weeks before he left before the front. Great sympathy is felt with Mrs Warnock and her family in the loss of this promising young officer, following so soon after the death of his father in December last.
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17/12/2018 Lieut Hugh Adolphus Hector Warnock From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th November 1915: Lieutenant Warnock, Clogher
17/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson Lance Corporal Thomas Lawson, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, has written his parents at Milltown, Dungannon, from Gallipoli stating that he is well and is having a rest in the rear trenches. He says that he is so safe and comfortable in his dugout that it amuses him to hear the shells whistling overhead.
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17/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th November 1915: Corporal Lawson Resting - (Brother of George Lawson)
16/12/2018 R/man Owen McGill Owen had served with army but his period of service had expired before the war broke out.
16/12/2018 R/man Owen McGill At first mass in Donaghmore Catholic Church on Sunday, the Vet Rev Canon J J McCartan, in referring to the sad event, said although a number of his parishioners had been wounded, McGill was the first of them to give his life for his country. He wished to express the congregation’s sincere sorrow and sympathy with the widow and relatives in their bereavement.
16/12/2018 R/man Owen McGill Mrs McGill, Castlecaulfield, received intimation from the War Office that her son, Private Owen McGill, of the First Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, had been killed in action in the fighting in France on 25th September. The deceased soldier had formerly been in the army, but his period of service had expired before the war broke out and he volunteered for service in September 1914, and had been wounded in February last. Prior to the war he took a prominent part in the National Volunteer movement (I.V.F.), and was drill instructor of the Annaghmakeown Company. The deceased is the first soldier from Castlecaulfield to be killed in the present war.
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16/12/2018 R/man Owen McGill From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 16th October 1915: Private Owen McGill
16/12/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. ‘This leaves me very well at present and I am still in the land of the living. I hope to see you all this winter if everything goes well until then. At present the Germans are getting a good hiding all along the line and I expect you will have heard the news. It is the best we have done yet, but the fighting is very heavy. The weather is awful at present and it is a great drawback, as there is nothing but rain and up to our eyes in mud. Remember me to all the boys.’
16/12/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. Gunner James Lynn, Royal Field Artillery. Writing to friends in Coalisland on 1st October says:-
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16/12/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 16th October 1915: Gunner James Lynn
15/12/2018 Pte. David Sands ‘Just a few lines to let you know I am doing well. We have a very hot time of it at the Dardanelles and have had heavy losses. We have been under very sharp fire, and shells have dropped all around us. I had a very narrow escape lately, as a shell fell beside me but did not burst. I was coming from the observing station at the time when it dropped on a hill only twenty yards from me and about one mile from our own guns. The enemy were only ranging to find our position, but I had a very lucky escape.’
15/12/2018 Pte. David Sands Bombardier James Sandes, R.G.A., writing from the Dardanelles on 16th September to his mother, Mrs Sandes, Mullaghanagh, Dungannon, says:-
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15/12/2018 Pte. David Sands From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 9th October 1915: Bombardier Sandes’ Escape (brother of David Sands)
15/12/2018 Pte. John Lynn John Lynn was a member of Coalisland L.O.L. No 93.
15/12/2018 Pte. John Lynn The annual meeting of Coalisland LO.L. No 93 (Killyman District) was held on Friday evening, when Br S J Wylie, W.M., presided and Br R J Proctor occupied the vice-chair. The meeting was duly opened. Hugh Montgomery conducted the election of officers for 1916, which resulted as follows:- W.M. Samuel J Wylie (re-elected); D.M. Thomas Neill; Chaplain Rev S Ganden; secretary James Templeton; treasurer Joseph Proctor. The newly elected W.M. thanked the brethren for the cordial support given him during his present term of office and said that there had never been greater need for Orangemen to work together than at the present crisis. He referred with pride to the fact over one half of the lodge members were on active service on behalf of their King and country, and some of them had already sacrificed their lives in the cause of freedom. He hoped the coming year would bring peace and all the brethren on active service would return safe and sound. (Applause). A cordial welcome was given to Brother John Lynn, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who is home on sick leave from the front and was able to attend the meeting. Hearty congratulations were also extended to the D.M., Brother Thomas Neill on his recent marriage and he replied thanking the brethren for their good wishes. The lodge was then duly closed. Afterwards a social hour was spent, when songs were rendered by A Atkinson, J Proctor, Samuel Butler, Hugh Montgomery, J Archer, Samuel J Wylie, James Templeton, R J Proctor, John Lynn, Thomas Holmes and J Proctor (senior).
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15/12/2018 Pte. John Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 9th October 1915:
14/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson ‘You mention in your letter that there was a fellow down there looking for me. His name is Ashfield and he got wounded beside me, as we were both hit with the same shell. I am glad to hear he got home. We have good times out here now, and the weather is very warm during the day. I cannot tell you anything about our movements as we are not allowed, but are doing well. I wish the war was over, and I hope the Lord I will keep safe through it all. You need not be uneasy about me.’
14/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson Lance Corporal Thomas Lawson, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who had been wounded and has now returned to the front, in writing to his parents at Milltown, Dungannon, from the Dardanelles on 8th September says:-
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14/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd October 1915: (Thomas Lawson - Brother of George Lawson)
14/12/2018 2nd Lt William Porter Second Lieutenant William Porter, 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was shot in the chest during the recent Suvla Bay operations has returned home from hospital and is almost restored to health. He is a younger son of Mr William Porter, Beechview, Balmoral Avenue, Belfast and brother-in-law of R W Bingham, headmaster Dungannon Royal School. Particulars about Lieutenant Porter recently appeared in this paper.
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14/12/2018 2nd Lt William Porter From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd October 1915:
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass In his Will, he left all to his mother, Mrs Lizzie Glass, Milltown Street, Dungannon.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass In the event of my death, I give the whole of my money to Mrs Lizzie Glass, Milltown Street, Dungannon, County Tyrone. No 23206. Private David Glass, 9th Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers,
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14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Last Will and Testament of Private David Glass dated 20th April 1916:
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Private William Bell, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, writing to his mother, Mrs Glass, Milltown, Dungannon, from the front says that he suffering from shock and is recovering.
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14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 6th November 1915: Private Bell Suffers From Shock (half-brother of David Glass)
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Private William Bell, 2nd Royal Irish Fusiliers, writing from France to his mother, Mrs E Glass, Brooke Street, Dungannon, says:- ‘I am glad of your parcel as we were up in the trenches at the time it arrived and hadn’t a smoke, so it came in very handy. We have some rough times out here, but will have to put up with it if we intend to beat the Germans, which we will do shortly.’ In a further letter he mentions:- ‘I would have written sooner but that the regiment got a lot of knocking about this last while. I suppose you thought my days were numbered but, thank God, I am still going on strong and keeping up the snapping at the Germans.’
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14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 2nd October 1915: Private Bell Needed a Smoke (half-brother of David Glass)
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass David’s half-brother, William Bell, also served,
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass By 1911, the family was still living in Brooke Street. David was 12 years old. His mother Lizzie was a cotton weaver.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass The 1901 census records Lizzie as having two families. David Glass is two years old and living with the family at Brooke Street, Dungannon. His mother was a linen weaver.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass David Glass was born in Dungannon on 9th June 1898. He had a twin sister, Edith Glass.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Family 2: Wilson Glass, Elizabeth Glass, Wilson Glass (born 5th March 1895), Leslie Glass (born 8th February 1896), David Glass (born 9th June 1898), Edith Glass (born 9th June 1898).
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Wilson Glass and Elizabeth Bell were married on 25th September 1894 in the district of Dungannon. They went on to have four children.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Elizabeth’s first husband, William Bell, died either on 6th October 1890 (age 32) or 14th October 1893 (age 26) in the district of Dungannon.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Known family 1: William Bell, Elizabeth Bell, Annie Bell (born 9th July 1878), William Bell (born 1st May 1882, Lurgan)?, John Bell (born 10th June 1884), Sarah Bell (born 17th January 1886), Elizabeth Bell (born 4th July 1888).
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass William Bell and Elizabeth Gilmour were married on 21st December 1877 in the district of Dungannon. It is believed they had five children.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass David Glass was the son of Wilson and Elizabeth Glass. This was Elizabeth’s second marriage.
14/12/2018 Pte. David Glass Private David Glass was serving with the 9th Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers when he died of wounds on Thursday 7th June 1917, David was just two days short of his 19th birthday.
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert Jeffs Mr Robert Jeffs, Gortmerron, Dungannon, received official intimation on Saturday that his second son, Private Robert Jeffs, Royal Army Medical Corps, has died of enteric fever on 29th August at the Gallipoli Peninsula. In an accompanying note, Lord Kitchener stated that he had been commanded by the King to assure the bereaved parents of the true sympathy of His Majesty and the Queen in their sorrow. Private Jeffs, who was 23 years of age, had been employed as a linen lapper at Dundalk with Messrs Dickson & Company Milltown, Dungannon and had volunteered on 14th November last.
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13/12/2018 Pte. Robert Jeffs From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915: Private Robert Jeffs
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds The Death March in Saul was performed, the congregation reverently standing.
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds ‘Before giving out the text we have once more to refer this morning to the loss of two more of those who went forth from us in the service of the country. One has fallen in battle – Corporal McReynolds, and one has succumbed to disease – Private Robert Jeffs. The bodies of both of them lie far away from home beneath the grass of the Dardanelles, where they met the enemy of their country. We are sorry for the grief their death must cause but if there is any consolation for their loss, it must lie in this - They had died a soldier’s death, they have died fighting the battles of freedom, and no life blood is poured vainlessly, which is shed in defence of so noble a cause. It was said by a French General, who had lost two sons in the war, and it was also said by an English lady that one must not grieve overmuch, though one cannot but be sorry for the deaths of such heroes. From their death life springs, and the great cause of liberty is maintained and ennobled. Such is the consolation at the present time, and every family which has lost one of its members in the great cause ought to be remembered amongst us with special honour. Their sons have given their lives and they could do no more. They have sacrificed themselves to free us from danger and the grief which the relatives feel, ought to be shared by them all. This is bearing one another’s burdens, and so fulfilling the law of Christ. We publicly tender our thanks and our sincere sympathy, and we leave the souls of those who have gone in the hands of the God who made them, and who grieves over a soldier’s death, no less than we do.’
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds At St Anne’s Parish Church on Sunday morning, Rev F S Morrow, B.A., in referring to recent casualties said:-
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13/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915: Dungannon’s Roll of Honour – Pulpit reference
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert Jeffs The Death March in Saul was performed, the congregation reverently standing.
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert Jeffs ‘Before giving out the text we have once more to refer this morning to the loss of two more of those who went forth from us in the service of the country. One has fallen in battle – Corporal McReynolds, and one has succumbed to disease – Private Robert Jeffs. The bodies of both of them lie far away from home beneath the grass of the Dardanelles, where they met the enemy of their country. We are sorry for the grief their death must cause but if there is any consolation for their loss, it must lie in this - They had died a soldier’s death, they have died fighting the battles of freedom, and no life blood is poured vainlessly, which is shed in defence of so noble a cause. It was said by a French General, who had lost two sons in the war, and it was also said by an English lady that one must not grieve overmuch, though one cannot but be sorry for the deaths of such heroes. From their death life springs, and the great cause of liberty is maintained and ennobled. Such is the consolation at the present time, and every family which has lost one of its members in the great cause ought to be remembered amongst us with special honour. Their sons have given their lives and they could do no more. They have sacrificed themselves to free us from danger and the grief which the relatives feel, ought to be shared by them all. This is bearing one another’s burdens, and so fulfilling the law of Christ. We publicly tender our thanks and our sincere sympathy, and we leave the souls of those who have gone in the hands of the God who made them, and who grieves over a soldier’s death, no less than we do.’
13/12/2018 Pte. Robert Jeffs At St Anne’s Parish Church on Sunday morning, Rev F S Morrow, B.A., in referring to recent casualties said:-
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13/12/2018 Pte. Robert Jeffs From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 25th September 1915: Dungannon’s Roll of Honour – Pulpit reference
13/12/2018 Lieut Lee Tolerton Lieutenant Lee Tolerton, 6th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, who was killed in action at the Dardanelles on 15th August, is the younger son of the late Mr Samuel Tolerton, who was an efficient teacher at Stangmore National School, Dungannon. His mother was the late Mrs Tolerton, who well-known throughout Ireland as secretary to the Philanthropic Reform Association, Dublin, in working of which she was closely connected with Lady Aberdeen and the Earl of Meath. The deceased officer was a nephew of Mr Robert Hill Tolerton, Coolecush, Dungannon, and of Mrs Cunningham, Park Road, Dungannon – indeed it was in that lady’s house that he was born shortly after the lamented death of his father. He was just under 21 years of age and was one of the officers who joined the army after the outbreak of war, his commission as lieutenant being dated 1st February 1915.
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13/12/2018 Lieut Lee Tolerton From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 18th September 1915:
10/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn The service, which was conducted by Rev Canon McEndoo, M.A., was attended by the household staff and demesne employees and their families, and the deceased’s widow and children were also present. The hymn, ‘O God our help in ages past’ and the special hymn ‘Loving shepherd of Thy sheep’ were sung and prayers from the Burial Service and the 15th chapter of 1st Corinthians were read. An address was given by Rev F S Morrow, B.A., from the words of the Burial Service – ‘In the midst of life we are in death’, in which he eloquently referred to Corporal Dunn having given his life for his country.
10/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn Through the kindness of The Countess of Ranfurly, a memorial service in connection with the death of Corporal Fred J Dunne, 5th Battalion Royal Irish Regiment, who was killed in action at the Gallipoli Peninsula on 16th August, was held in the dining room of Northland House, Dungannon on Friday. Corporal Dunn had been the estate carpenter for the Earl of Ranfurly, and had been an efficient section leader in the Dungannon Battalion U.V.F. prior to volunteering on the outbreak of the present war.
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10/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 18th September 1915: Corporal F J Dunn, Dungannon
10/12/2018 Capt William Tillie Dickson Lieutenant William T Dickson, 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, returned home to Dungannon on Friday evening, invalided owing to an attack of fever contracted at the Gallipoli Peninsula. He took part in the famous landing at Suvla Bay and in the subsequent fighting, but on the fourth day he developed symptoms of illness, and was removed on board ship and sent to England. Lieutenant Dickson, who is the eldest son of Mr James Dickson, J.P., Milltown House, Dungannon, and grandson of the late Right Honourable T A Dickson, P.C., commanded C Company of the Dungannon Battalion U.V.F., and was one of the first members of that battalion to volunteer for active service at the outbreak of the war. He enlisted as a private in the 6th Inniskilling Fusiliers, and afterwards received a commission and subsequent promotion.
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10/12/2018 Capt William Tillie Dickson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 18th September 1915: – Lieutenant W T Dickson Home Again
09/12/2018 Maj Hugh Price Travers Major Hugh Price Travers, Duke of Wellington Regiment, 8th Battalion, missing at the Dardanelles, is the third son of the late Colonel Henry Travers, of Kincraigie, Courtmacsherry, County Cork, and comes of a long line of soldiers, one of his uncles being the late General James Travers, V.C. He was through the South African war. In 1907 Major Travers married Margaret Edith Ellis, eldest daughter of the late Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney. He formerly resided at Grange Park, Moy which his father had rented. He was a noted rugby football player and gave his services on behalf of Dungannon Rugby Football Club for several years.
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09/12/2018 Maj Hugh Price Travers From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: – Major Travers Missing
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Private Robert McReynolds is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery in Turkey.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Robert left behind a widow and a small family.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Private Robert McReynolds was serving with the 1st/6th Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry when he died of wounds received on 14th August 1915 during the Gallipoli Campaign. He was 29.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Private McReynolds came back to Dungannon and went to Egypt in May last preparatory to going to the Dardanelles.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Private McReynolds went abroad with the First Expeditionary Force and was wounded in the retreat from Mons.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Robert enlisted in Glasgow in 1914. He joined the Highland Light Infantry.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds The Ulster Covenant in 1912 lists Robert as signing at 100 Wellington Street, Glasgow.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds About 1904 he signed up with the Scottish Territorials. He served with them for ten years.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Robert McReynolds went to live in Scotland.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Known family: John McReynolds, Margaret McReynolds, Eliza J McReynolds (born about 1882), Robert McReynolds (born about 1885), Annie McReynolds (born about 1886).
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds By the time of the 1901 census the family was living in Linfield Street in Dungannon. Robert was working as a linen band tier. He was 16 years old. His father was a labourer.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Robert McReynolds was the son of John and Margaret McReynolds. He was born in Lisburn about 1886.
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds Mrs Clayton, The Park, Dungannon, has received intimation that her brother, Corporal Robert McReynolds, of the Black Watch, has died from the effects of wounds received at the Gallipoli Peninsula on 14th August. Corporal McReynolds, who was a son of the late Mr John McReynolds, was a native of Dungannon. When employed in Glasgow, he served ten years in the Scottish Territorials, and on the outbreak of the present war joined the Black Watch. He went abroad with the First Expeditionary Force and was wounded in the retreat from Mons. He came back to Dungannon and went to Egypt in May last preparatory to going to the Dardanelles. He leaves a widow and a small family.
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09/12/2018 Pte. Robert McReynolds From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: Corporal McReynolds
09/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson Lance Corporal Thomas Lawson, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, has intimated to his parents at Milltown, Dungannon, that he has recovered from his wounds received at the first landing at the Dardanelles and has returned to the front.
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09/12/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: Lance Corporal Thomas Lawson (Brother of George Lawson)
08/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn Corporal Dunn, who leaves a widow and several small children, had been estate carpenter to the Earl of Ranfurly for over three years. He had been a section leader in the Dungannon Battalion of the Ulster Volunteer Force, and had volunteered with the Dungannon contingent on 26th August 1914, to join the 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, but he was afterwards transferred to his present regiment. He had had four years’ service in the 1st (Volunteer) Battalion Royal Berks Regiment in England, of which country he was a native.
08/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn ‘Dear Mrs Dunn, as your husband’s officer, I must write and offer you my sympathy in your great loss. It may comfort you to know that he was killed instantly and there was no suffering. He carried on his work cheerily to the last, and behaved as you would have wished him to. Sincerely yours, Lieutenant T E N Byrne.’
08/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn Much express was expressed in Dungannon on Wednesday when it became known that Corporal Frederick J Dunn, 5th Battalion Royal Irish Regiment (Pioneers), had been killed in action during the recent Gallipoli operations. The sad news was conveyed in the following letter to his young widow, written by Lieutenant T E N Byrne of the same battalion:-
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08/12/2018 Pte. Frederick James Dunn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 11th September 1915: Corporal F J Dunn
08/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) Corporal Johnston then, very thoughtfully, obtained a sheet of zinc and punched Lord Northland’s name, etc, in it and nailed it to the wooden cross, where it still remains unaffected by the weather, and will render the grave easily discoverable when the war is over. He also employed a French photographer to take a photo of the grave, and forwarded it to Lady Ranfurly. On Friday last, when on his way to the front, he paid Lady Ranfurly a visit in London at her request.
08/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) Having heard a rumour that a ‘Captain Northland’ was in the fatal list, Johnston made enquiries and found to his deep sorrow that it was his old Volunteer leader who was dead. A week later when Johnston was relieved in the trenches, he made his way to Lord Northland’s platoon and found that the latter had met his death at the famous La Bassee brickyard. He had been buried at La Bassee cemetery wrapped up in his great coat. Johnston visited the grave, and assisted by two French grave diggers, erected a proper mound over it, and finding some plants of boxwood, placed them around the grave. A wooden cross, bearing Lord Northland’s name, had been erected over the grave, but Johnston, fearing that the writing on it might become obliterated, wrote to Lady Ranfurly suggesting that a brass cross with inscription should be sent over from London. Her Ladyship however replied that she feared, in case of a German attack or English retreat, that the brilliancy of the metal might cause the grave to be disturbed by shell fire.
08/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) The only time Corporal Johnston saw the late Lord Northland was two days before the latter was killed. Johnston heard that Lord Northland was at the front and had been looking out for him. On the day in question, the Coldstream Guards were passing on the Inniskillings’ left and Lord Northland, recognising Johnston, beckoned to him and called him to look him up. Johnston was unable to do so, and two days later Lord Northland was killed.
08/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) Corporal John Johnston, 2nd Royal Inniskillings, returned to the front on Thursday last and received a hearty send-off at Dungannon Railway Station from a number of well-wishers. It was at St Julien on 8th May that Corporal Johnston distinguished himself by taking command of four machine guns for three hours, when all the officers had either been killed or wounded. The fighting was so desperate that he states General French himself came up to the firing line to encourage the men and sent his two sides-de-camp to bring in the wounded. A Church of England bishop viewed the Festubert attack from a little hill, and he afterwards told the men that it was marvellous that any of them had returned safely, and he could not understand how men could live in such a fire. The night before the attack the bishop had held a service at which 600 of the Inniskillings had attended, but at the next church parade there was but a scanty remnant present.
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08/12/2018 Capt Thomas Uchter Caulfeild Knox (Northland) From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th September 1915: Corporal Johnston’s Experiences
08/12/2018 Lieut Hewitt Huggard Lieutenant Hewitt Huggard, 6th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment, who is reported as missing in the Gallipoli Peninsula during the recent operations (in which two of his brother officers were killed, two were wounded and five, including his colonel, returned as missing), is the eldest son of Captain the Rev Richard Huggard, M.A., formerly curate of St Anne’s Parish Church, Dungannon, and was born in that town. Rev R Huggard, who is now rector of Barnsley, Yorkshire, was prior to his ministry in Dungannon, curate of Tuam and of St Michael’s, Galway. He was an enthusiastic and typical Irish sportsman and his work on behalf of Irish Rugby Football was universally recognised. In the land of the Saxon his Irish zeal was even more evident and he became a past president of the Yorkshire Rugby Union. He enlisted in the new army and threw so much zeal into recruiting in the Barnsley district that 2,700 men, over two battalions, have passed through his hands into the ranks of the York and Lancasters. He therefore well earned his present rank of Captain in the 14th Service Battalion York and Lancasters by his administrative work, even if the leadership of forces in the field is denied him. In addition to the missing officer, another son holds a commission in the 13th Service Battalion York and Lancasters, so that clerical house possesses a good family record.
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08/12/2018 Lieut Hewitt Huggard From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th September 1915: Dungannon Officer Missing
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes The distance we travelled on horseback was roughly about 130 miles, and we are as fit as the proverbial fiddle, and our horses in pretty good condition. There is plenty of splendid water here. This is a part of German South West where no Britisher has ever been before, and it seems we have to explore right from east to west, so as to ensure there are no Germans remaining.
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes On the following day the scouts came back and reported they could find no other way, so we proceeded seemingly still in the wrong direction, but after spending a very cold night, the first thing we discovered to cheer us up was a road leading to the right, and a signpost marked ‘Narudas Sud, 48 kilometres (30 miles).’ Well of all the rough roads and stony places it has ever been my lot to go over in the worst parts of South Africa, this road, in German South West Africa, took the biscuit, and the German surveyor must have made a huge mistake in his measurements, as the distance to Narudas was more like sixty miles. When we got there we found, to our surprise and disgust that the Germans had cleared out after burning down the buildings and doing so much damage to their property as they could.
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes There were plenty of Steinbuck and Kudus (African Antelope) in those wilds, so that we got fresh meat. Then a lot of brushwood was collected and we soon had a roaring fire. We did really know how to cook the meat, so we made a stew and the result was pronounced successful. We had a jolly good tuck-in, and you would have thought it was a picnic, all sitting around the fire, each with a steaming mug of coffee, smoking and relating various experiences.
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes We passed on our way numerous signposts with arrows pointing out direction of the next place, and how many kilometres. In every place we passed through that had been formerly inhabited, we could see the kind of lazy life they led, there been thousands of empty beer and wine bottles. On our fourth day we absolutely got into the heart of the mountains, and in some places it was as much as the horses could do to scale the heights. Our rate of travelling was accordingly reduced to about two or three miles an hour, and we had no idea whether we were going the proper way or not, so we camped and sent out scouts in different directions.
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes We started off on horseback and passed through lots of German places, which the enemy had evacuated, particularly Narubis, a really lovely spot, with magnificent buildings and stables, good water supply etc., which would do credit to any of the big cities at home. Why the Germans did not put up a fight at several of these places no one can make out, as they are natural fortifications, and a few hundred men could keep thousands at bay. We proceeded on our way through the sand, camping out at night after looking after our horses and enjoying our bully beef and biscuits. Some parts of the country did not look so bad but generally, it was nothing but sand heights on every side so far as the eye could see.
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes We stopped at Keetsmanhoof for three days, when we got orders to proceed to take Narudas (now part of Namibia), a place Headquarters knew was a fortified German police station, but did not know the distance or road to it, but only the direction where it was situated.
07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes Trooper Hamilton Burrowes, pf the 5th Regiment south Africa Mounted Rifles, writing to his mother, Mrs Burrowes, ‘Hillside’, Dungannon, from Narudas, German South West Africa says:- ‘I am writing from one of the most outlandish places it is possible to find, situated amongst the mountains. To begin with, we sailed from Capetown by the Rufidji, a German prize boat, commandeered by the Government. We arrived at Linderitzbucht after a pleasant sea voyage, and marvelous to relate, no one was sick on the four day journey. Fifty-one men in an open truck, not to speak of our saddlery and kitbags. You can imagine there was not much sleep during the night time, and it was also bitterly cold. We travelled at a good pace, in fact the train broke all records for the distance, arriving six hours before the scheduled time.
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07/12/2018 Trooper Hamilton Hugh Burrowes From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 4th September 1915: Trooper Hamilton Burrowes in South West Africa
05/12/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. Bombardier James Lynn, 6th Division Royal Field Artillery, writing from France to friends in Coalisland referred in feeling terms to the death in action of his brother, Driver Robert Lynn, and to the wounding of his other two brothers, but as he says, somebody had to go and he was one of them. It was during the last operations that he was killed.
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05/12/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 28th August 1915: Bombardier James Lynn
05/12/2018 Capt William Tillie Dickson DICKSON – SINCLAIR - 23rd August, by special license, at 38 Windsor Park, Belfast, by Rev A H Dill, M.A., assisted by Rev Robert Workman, M.A., uncles of the bride, T C H Dickson, Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, younger son of James Dickson, Milltown House, Dungannon, county Tyrone, to Mary, only daughter of John Sinclair, 38 Windsor Park, Belfast.
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05/12/2018 Capt William Tillie Dickson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 28th August 1915: Marriages (T C H Dickson – brother of W T Dickson)
04/12/2018 Pte. Alexander Watt Among the latest recruits in the new army is Mr Willie Watt, son of Mr Joseph Watt, George’s Street, Dungannon. He emigrated two and a half years ago and has joined the 8th Canadian Mounted Rifles, and is at present in training in Toronto. While in Dungannon he was very popular. He was an active member of the local Church Lads’ Brigade Corps and Dungannon Brass Band.
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04/12/2018 Pte. Alexander Watt From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 21st August 1915: William Watt (brother of Alexander Watt)
04/12/2018 Pte. William John Telford Private William Telford has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
04/12/2018 Pte. William John Telford ‘On the 8th May the 1st Yorks and Lancs regiments were in huts at Flamertinghe. At 11.30 in the morning we had orders to stand to, and a quarter of an hour afterwards we went to the trenches, and for about three miles after that we were exposed to heavy shell fire. We got into the shallow trench and waited there that day. Then we got orders to fix bayonets, as we were going to attack the trench at eight o’clock that night. We got about 100 yards off from the German trenches, and lay down in the open for, I should think, ten or fifteen minutes. We had lost heavily, and there did not seem anyone to take command. Someone gave the order to retire, and we started to retire from the road and got back to the trenches that we had been in on the morning. We stopped there that night and all the next day and were bombarded all the time. During that day the last officer (there was one after all) Mr Briscoe, got killed, and the Germans came up during that night. The officer’s servants went out to look for their officers but found none. A few wounded men got back, but a lot were left out. We were relieved the following night, I may add that during the whole of this time the shelling was terrific.’
04/12/2018 Pte. William John Telford Much anxiety is felt by the relatives in Dungannon of Corporal William Telford (18140), 1st Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment, son of Mr Richard Telford, Dungannon, who has been missing since 8th May last. The Army Records state that he was wounded in France on that date and that his whereabouts are unknown. He had been a member of the Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C.) for several years and was a well-known and popular instrumentalist in the Depot Band. For a year prior to the outbreak of war, he had been a member of the Yorkshire County Police Force, and had volunteered for service with the York and Lancasters at the commencement of hostilities. The British Red Cross have made careful enquiries about him, and have obtained the following report from a corporal of the same battalion, giving a general account of the attack made by the British on the date in question:-
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04/12/2018 Pte. William John Telford From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 21st August 1915: Bandsman Telford Missing
04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands A newspaper report from December 1915 states that he was back at the front.
04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands Gunner Sands was injured in France on 4th August 1915. He was removed to Manchester War Hospital.
04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands He had done garrison duty in England for some time before going to the front in 1915.
04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands On the outbreak of war Gunner Patrick Sands was with his battalion in India.
04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands Mrs Sands, Mullaghanagh, Dungannon, has received official intimation that her second son, Private Patrick Sands, Royal Garrison Artillery, is at present in Manchester War Hospital suffering from wounds received in France on 4th August. Private Sands is one of three brothers on active service. He had been in the army for the past six years, and on the outbreak of war was with his battalion in India. He had done garrison duty in England for some time and went to the front some months ago.
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04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 21st August 1915: Private Patrick Sands in Hospital
04/12/2018 Gnr Patrick Joseph Sands Patrick Sands enlisted in Dungannon around 1909.
03/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn The parents of Driver Robert Lynn, 87th Battery Royal Field Artillery, who resides at Mousetown, Coalisland, have received official intimation that he was killed in action in France on 4th August. Driver Lynn, who was one of four brothers serving at the Western front., had gone out with the first expeditionary force, and had participated in all the principal engagements. His interesting letters have frequently appeared in these columns.
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03/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 14th August 1915: Driver Robert Lynn
02/12/2018 Capt Bernard Score Browne M.C. Colonel Edward George Browne, who is attached to the Headquarters Medical Service Staff at present operating in France, has been mentioned in despatches for courageous conduct during the recent severe attacks. He had been in India for several years and had just been granted three months sick leave when war broke out, and on landing at Portsmouth, was immediately sent by the War Office to the front. In attending the wounded soldiers in a shell swept zone he was gassed, but pluckily continued in his meritorious work. Colonel Browne, who was born at Killymaddy House, Dungannon, is a brother of Colonel William Browne, J.P., Northland Row, Dungannon; Dr T D Browne, Benburb; and Dr T J Browne, Dublin, Local Government Board Medical Inspector and is well known in the district.
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02/12/2018 Capt Bernard Score Browne M.C. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 7th August 1915: Dungannon Officer’s Pluck (uncle of Bernard Browne)
02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn ‘I am quite well and in the best of form. I saw the ‘Dungannon News’ where Corporal Johnston, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, of Dungannon, had such great faith in the Germans method with prisoners. He seems to know all about it. Does he know what the Germans did at the beginning of the war when they were flushed with their victories before November and December? They captured a few of our chaps and couldn’t send them back, so they shot them out of hand and then ran like cowards. A little incident during the fighting at Aisne does away with all ideas of the Germans. During a lull in the fighting the Prussians were opposed in the trenches by a certain Yorkshire regiment. The Germans took up a white flag, but our fellows took no notice. Two or three times the Germans put the flag up, and the officer commanding at last told the Yorks to stand up in the trench. They had no sooner shown themselves to the Germans than they were shot down like sheep. There have been several instances when a regiment of infantry, seeing themselves outnumbered and beaten, have surrendered, thinking they would be taken prisoners, but as soon as the enemy have got near them, they have shot them down. Another incident I add to German cruelty is of a young fellow of a certain regiment out here. When his regiment had to retire out of the first line of trench temporarily, he stuck to the trench. The Germans had sent gas out and he said his respirator was good, and that he would stop on. When his regiment counter attacked and regained the trench, they found the plucky lad with no fewer than eighteen bayonet wounds in his body. We are not allowed to express things as we would like, especially when a fellow soldier starts contradicting one of us who has come through the thick of the fighting since last August and, thank God, is still alive and well’
02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn Driver R Lynn, of the 87th Battery, writing to his people at Coalisland, on 24th July says:-
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02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 31st July 1915: Driver Lynn Replies
02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn ‘Referring to Corporal Johnston’s contradictions of Driver Lynn’s letter in your paper, which has come to my notice, I must say that he knows very little, and has seen very little of the barbarous crimes of the Huns. Perhaps if he had been the great retreat he would have had his eyes opened, when often we took up on our limbers and wagons infantry stragglers, completely done up and afraid to lie down, well knowing the fate that had befallen some of their comrades. The Germans were pretty close on our heels in those days, and were out for any sort of crime. They did not hesitate to bayonet or shoot such of our men as were left behind to their fate. I could give him several other cases, but it best to reserve them for future occasion if necessary. As regards ‘No Man’s Land’ which he speaks of, I think if he had been in our vicinity during some of the gas attacks, he would have seen plenty of the Hun’s crimes. When the Canadian troops had to fall back there were, I am sorry to say, many left behind, and some of their bodies are still there at the present time of writing owing to the difficulty of getting them in to bury. As regards infantry men being the only ones to see this sort of thing, I say again he is mistaken. I myself, as a signaler and telephonist, and also our observers, have been in the front line of trenches every week since the beginning, and but for our guns the infantry would have soon had to retire.’
02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn The Lynn-Johnston controversy in this paper on the question of German cruelties seems to have aroused the liveliest interest in the trenches, and we have today received the following letter from another artillery man at the front with the 43rd Battery, Royal Field Artillery, 12th Brigade, 6th Division:-
02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn 02114
02/12/2018 Driver Robert Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 31st July 1915: The Lynn-Johnston Controversy
02/12/2018 Capt Bernard Score Browne M.C. From the Belfast Newsletter dated 1st March 1918: Army Medical Service Edward Browne (uncle of Bernard Brown)
01/12/2018 Pte. Joseph McIntyre Corporal John McIntyre, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, returned home to Dungannon on Monday. It will be remembered that he received very serious wounds in the back during the big fight at Festubert in May last, and was a considerable period in hospital in England. He is now progressing rapidly, and has obtained ten days leave.
01/12/2018 Pte. Joseph McIntyre 02113
01/12/2018 Pte. Joseph McIntyre From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 31st July 1915: Corporal John McIntyre (brother of Joseph McIntyre)
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