Friends of the Somme - Mid Ulster Branch  
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Date Name Information
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn The CWGC record Lance Corporal William Andrew Fairbairn as the son of Thomas and Margaret Fairbairn, of McKee's Terrace, Dungannon, County Tyrone.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Lance Corporal William Fairbairn is buried in Perth Cemetery (China Wall). The cemetery is located three kilometres east of Ypres town centre.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn The adjutant of the regiment, Captain Anderson, wrote to his brother, stating that he had been most popular with everyone in the regiment and was a most promising non-commissioned officer.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Lance Corporal Fairbairn was instantaneously killed early in the morning by a shell which burst close beside him.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Lance Corporal William Andrew Fairbairn was serving with ‘B’ Squadron of the 8th (King's Royal Irish) Hussars when he was killed in action on Sunday 13th June 1915.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn William was considerably over six feet in height, and was acclaimed to be one of the best swordsmen in the regiment.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn In late 1914, Lance Corporal Fairbairn was sent from India to the front in France.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Around 1911, William Fairbairn joined the Hussars and served in India.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn By the time of the 1911 census, William was not living with the family.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn The 1910 Ulster Towns Directory lists Mrs Fairbairn as an egg dealer at William Street, Dungannon.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn The 1901 census records William Andrew as 9 years old. William and the family were living at house 1 in Ballygawley Road, Dungannon. They had 3 servants.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Known family: Thomas Fairbairn, Margaret Fairbairn, John Charles Fairbairn (born 5th July 1886), Joseph Fairbairn (born 9th April 1887, died 22nd September 1892, age 5), Thomas Walker Fairbairn (born 17th August 1889), William Andrew Fairbairn (born 26th December 1891), Margaret Fairbairn (born 1st February 1893, died 1st February 1893), Sara Edith Fairbairn (born 5th July 1894), James Harrison Fairbairn (born 2nd November 1895), Fred Roberts Fairbairn (born 25th March 1900), Annie Fairbairn (born 30th July 1901, died 29th August 1902, age 1).
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Thomas was a butter and egg merchant. He was born in Kirkoswald, Cumberland.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn William Andrew Fairbairn was born on 26th December 1891 in Dungannon. He was one of ten children, six surviving.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn William Fairbairn was the son of Thomas and Margaret Fairbairn. Thomas Fairbairn and Margaret Charles were married on 1st June 1885 in the district of Dungannon.
24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn Much sympathy is expressed with Mr John Fairbairn, Park Road, Dungannon, owing to the death of his younger brother, Corporal William Fairbairn, 8th Hussars, who was killed in action in France on Sunday 13th June. Corporal Fairbairn, who was 23 years of age, spent his early days in Dungannon. He joined the Hussars four years ago and had served in India. He was considerably over six feet in height, and was accounted one of the best swordsmen in the regiment. He had been on active service in France for the past seven months. The sad news was communicated to Mr Fairbairn in a letter received on Monday morning from Captain Anderson, adjutant of the regiment, which state4d that Corporal Fairbairn had been instantaneously killed early in the morning by a shell which burst close beside him. Captain Anderson further stated that he had been most popular with everyone in the regiment and was a most promising non-commissioned officer.
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24/10/2018 L/Corp William Andrew Fairbairn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 26th June 1915: Corporal William Fairbairn
21/10/2018 Chaplain Rev Richard Ussher Greer GREER – 23 June (suddenly), at Seapatrick Rectory, Banbridge, the Rev R Ussher Greer. M.A., Chaplain to His Majesty’s Forces.
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21/10/2018 Chaplain Rev Richard Ussher Greer From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 26th June 1915: Deaths
21/10/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. The four sons of Mr and Mrs James Lynn, Mousetown, Coalisland, now fighting in France for King and country.
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21/10/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th June 1915: The Lynns
21/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn The four sons of Mr and Mrs James Lynn, Mousetown, Coalisland, now fighting in France for King and country.
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21/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th June 1915: The Lynns
21/10/2018 Driver Robert Lynn The four sons of Mr and Mrs James Lynn, Mousetown, Coalisland, now fighting in France for King and country.
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21/10/2018 Driver Robert Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th June 1915: The Lynns
21/10/2018 Pte. John Lynn The four sons of Mr and Mrs James Lynn, Mousetown, Coalisland, now fighting in France for King and country.
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21/10/2018 Pte. John Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th June 1915: The Lynns
14/10/2018 2nd Lt Joseph Marsh A social was held in Newmills Orange Hall on Friday evening, in connection with the departure of Corporal Joseph Marsh, 13th (County Down) Royal Irish Rifles, a useful member of L.O.L. No. 183, Newmills, who is proceeding to England, preparatory to going to the front. After tea had been served, the chair was taken by Mr George Wright, Newmills, and dancing was indulged in, the music being supplied by Mr William Stewart. Mr Samuel Stewart acted as M.C. A musical programme was contributed at intervals by Miss Daisy McKnight, Miss L Irwin, Miss Burns, Messrs John Taylor, William Simpson, Alexander Roy, John Spratt, Victor McKnight, H A Beatty and the chairman. The chairman referred to the departure of Corporal Marsh from amongst them. Like many others of the young men of the district, he had volunteered in defence of his King and country, and they wished him all sorts of good luck and a safe return (applause). Corporal Marsh briefly replied and thanked them for their many kindnesses. He was proud to know that their village had gained the distinction of a Victoria Cross, and hoped and believed that their historic district would gain many more (loud applause). The enjoyable proceedings concluded at a late hour with the singing of Auld Lang Syne and the National Anthem.
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14/10/2018 2nd Lt Joseph Marsh From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 19th June 1915: Newmills Soldier Feted
14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes 02093
14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes This part of the country has been called ‘sin, sorrow and sore eyes’, and many men have gone totally blind, so we now use green veils over our helmets and wear smoked glass goggles. These are effective, but are very warm. Many of the stations on the way up from the coast bear amusing names, such as Hotszell – a really truthful description so far as the day is concerned, but at night the cold dew eats into your very marrow bones. From a mining point of view there are great potentialities here. We have struck upon a mica bed, sheets of it being as clear as glass, and we are using them for our goggles as they do not burn.'
14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes We have a visit twice a week from a German taube (plane), but up to the present it has not done us any great damage, but it’s appearance, generally about daylight, throws the camp into great excitement, as no matter where you are it always seems to be just overhead. The horses and mules seem to know all about it. It is an extraordinary sight to see some ten thousand horses and mules watering at one of the holes. All naturally try to get in first, and many are the fights for right of way. The German game is to abandon the roads and passes through which we are likely to come and lay contact mines. These have caused many casualties, but we now bring along goats and donkeys and send them over the ground first.
14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes This place is the limit so far as climate and vegetation are concerned. The whole country for about 150 miles inland from the sea is desert, and being undeveloped and not even prospected water holes are scarce, and any that exist have been poisoned by the Germans as they retreated. The chief difficulty is transport, and new railway lines required to be made before the troops could move. These lines require thousands of infantry to keep them swept clear of sand, as the sand dunes are always moving and cover up the track, all guiding marks being obliterated in a few hours’ time. This desert country presents the appearance of been at one time burnt to ashes. Hills, mountains and valleys are all coloured grey and drab, and the only signs of life are the flies and mosquitos which have developed the facility to torture the white man to a degree unknown in any other part of the world I have been in.
14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes ‘Just a line from the desert to say we are busy chasing square heads (Germans) both day and night in this God forsaken country, as they are always retreating and popping up again. When I returned to South Africa from Ireland I butted into this little bit (which as a volunteer regiment is second to none anywhere) and have arrived here via Walfish Bay. We are now guarding watering holes and railway lines and engaged at patrolling and scouting.
14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes Trooper Jack Burrowes, 1st Imperial Light Horse, writing from Rassing, German South West Africa, to friends in Dungannon, says:-
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14/10/2018 Corp John Jack Burrowes From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 12th June 1915: Trooper Burrowes in German South West Africa
13/10/2018 Pte. Robert Thomas Taylor Moygashel L.O.L. No. 708 (Killyman District) met on Friday evening, Brother John Shannon, W.M., in the chair. A vote of sympathy was accorded to Brother Private Robert Taylor, 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who is in hospital in England, recovering from wounds received at the western front.
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13/10/2018 Pte. Robert Thomas Taylor From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 12th June 1915:
13/10/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson ‘Just a few lines to let you know that I am getting better and able to walk about, but I am still very weak. The wound is alright now. The hospital here is full of wounded, and there are some terrible sights to look at. I hear out troops are giving the Turks a good beating as they cannot stand our bayonet charges. Cairo is a very nice place, but the heat is terrific. We have natives here in the hospital acting as orderlies. And they are funny boys. You cannot understand what they say as they chatter so. You might ask the Bells if they got any news about Robert, as I have heard noting of him since I got wounded.’
13/10/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson Lance Corporal Thomas Lawson, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was wounded at the Dardanelles, writing to his parents at Milltown, Dungannon, from the Kasr Al Ainy Hospital, Cairo, Egypt, says:-
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13/10/2018 Pte. Robert George Lawson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 12th June 1915: Corporal Lawson in Egypt - Thomas Lawson (Brother of George Lawson)
03/10/2018 Corp Henry Victor Sidney Donaldson Private L Meenagh, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his brother, Mr John Meenagh, Georges Street, Dungannon, says he is still alive and well. The Inniskillings had a terrible battle on Saturday night, 15th May. The fight lasted all Sunday and they succeeded in capturing three German trenches, and made an advance of three miles. Unfortunately the Inniskillings lost heavily, and a number of his chums were wounded. He mentions that Corporal Sidney Donaldson (son of Sergeant Donaldson) has been wounded. His brigade is now back from the trenches for a rest.
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03/10/2018 Corp Henry Victor Sidney Donaldson From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Private Meenagh in the Big Fight
03/10/2018 Pte. Lewis Meenagh Private L Meenagh, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his brother, Mr John Meenagh, Georges Street, Dungannon, says he is still alive and well. The Inniskillings had a terrible battle on Saturday night, 15th May. The fight lasted all Sunday and they succeeded in capturing three German trenches, and made an advance of three miles. Unfortunately the Inniskillings lost heavily, and a number of his chums were wounded. He mentions that Corporal Sidney Donaldson (son of Sergeant Donaldson) has been wounded. His brigade is now back from the trenches for a rest.
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03/10/2018 Pte. Lewis Meenagh From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Private Meenagh in the Big Fight
03/10/2018 Pte. John McGuigan The relatives of Private Henry McGuigan, Redford, Dungannon, 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers have been notified that he has been wounded by shrapnel in the heavy fighting at Hill 60, and is at present in hospital in Liverpool. Another brother, Private John McGuigan, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, has returned to France after leave through frostbite. A third brother, Private Peter McGuigan, who enlisted since the war broke out, is stationed at Buttevant, and belongs to the 9th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
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03/10/2018 Pte. John McGuigan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Three McGuigans at the Front
03/10/2018 Pte. Henry McGuigan The relatives of Private Henry McGuigan, Redford, Dungannon, 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers have been notified that he has been wounded by shrapnel in the heavy fighting at Hill 60, and is at present in hospital in Liverpool. Another brother, Private John McGuigan, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, has returned to France after leave through frostbite. A third brother, Private Peter McGuigan, who enlisted since the war broke out, is stationed at Buttevant, and belongs to the 9th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
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03/10/2018 Pte. Henry McGuigan From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Three McGuigans at the Front
03/10/2018 Pte. Charles McAnaw Kelly Corporal Eddie McAnaw, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing to his wife at at Barrack Street, Dungannon, says that his brother Charles was killed on 4th May. He did not know what to do, but saw him properly buried, and placed flowers on the poor boy’s grave. Charles was buried in the same graveyard as Lord Northland, the head of both graves meeting each other. ‘Tell them all at home to bear up as well as they can.’
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03/10/2018 Pte. Charles McAnaw Kelly From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Dungannon Lad’s Grave
03/10/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. Writing to his friends in Coalisland, Bombardier James Lynn, 43rd Battery, Royal Field Artillery, states that the infantry had a rough time of it for a week or so, but things were now quiet, although further work might soon be expected. Jack’s battalion had captured two lines of trenches from the Germans. His brother and Cairns were together, but he had had no word from them lately, so did not know how they had got on. The gas that the Germans were using was awful, and nothing could live in front of it. Grass, trees and plants withered up the same as if they were burned. He wished to be mentioned to old friends, a number of whom he particularly named.
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03/10/2018 Sgt. James Lynn M.M. From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Bombardier James Lynn on the Gas
03/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn ‘He is quite well and so is Sergeant William Lynn of Coalisland, who belongs to the same battalion. the battalion to which his chums Abernethy and Cardwell belonged had lost heaving in recent fighting, but they themselves were all right. The Germans were losing along the line, and the French had captured a thousand of them and some guns. He thought, with God’s help, they would be home for the Twelfth of July yet, and hoped that the drums would be in good order.
03/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn Private Alexander Proctor, Machine Gun Section, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers says:-
03/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn ‘I am well and getting on all right. We came out of the trenches a couple of days ago for a rest, and I tell you we had need of it. We were properly done up, having ben in the firing line since Good Friday with the exception of a few days. I had a post card yesterday from T Abernethy, saying that Cardwell and he were both well. I had begun to think that some of them were knocked over as they had lost a lot of men in the big battle lately. I was therefore very glad to see they were all right. None of the Coalisland boys had been knocked out yet and I hope it will continue so. I am afraid there will be a small turnout this Twelfth. Alex Proctor and I were just talking about it and wishing we might be home for it, but I doubt that the war is not going to be over so soon. I never saw Alex looking better than he does at present, and you would have to laugh if you could see his big red face. Indeed, I never felt better myself considering the hardships we have withstood since we came out.’
03/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn Sergeant William Lynn, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, writing to Mr Joseph Proctor, Coalisland, says:-
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03/10/2018 Sgt. William Edward Lynn From the Mid Ulster Mail dated 5th June 1915: Coalisland Men on the Twelfth
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